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Home » Honda scooter, Scooter

Honda Forza 250

Submitted by on September 9, 2012 – 3:45 amNo Comment

Honda Forza 250 Honda Forza 250  – The Forza is a modern, even futuristic machine… with no rust to be seen… the press bike tested was nearly 4 years old and holding up just fine. No, the only thing the Honda had in common with a car I might try and rescue from a scrap yard is personality. This is something I would never have expected from any of Honda’s products. You see, Honda scooters don’t really have personality… they tend to be so well put together that they have all personality engineered out of them. This is not to say the Forza isn’t well built, far from it, however it did have personality… and gadgets…

I am not sure where the Forza’s charm comes from; it could be the low slung, laid back riding position that makes you feel like you are riding some sort of sled. It could be because it leans and changes position like a much smaller bike while still managing to be as comfortable as an armchair. I am not entirely sure what it is; the fact of the matter is, on paper, I should hate this machine. It is low powered and heavy. It is a big wide maxi scooter that you can’t tour on due to its 110kph speed cut (which is potentially as fast as it can go with the factory gearing). So it is a touring scooter that you can only use as an urban commuter… This is where it gets interesting, you see it turns and manoeuvres like a much smaller machine. I suspect this is mainly an effect of the extremely low centre of gravity and relatively narrow tyres. The Forza snatched one of our quickest times to date around the TSR test track, this was unexpected but the scooter did inspire the confidence to ride it hard. This translates to the road as very nimble handling while carving through traffic or sneaking to the front of the cue at traffic lights.

Suspension and braking were both solid; with discs front and back stopping was always predictable and strong. The suspension was stiff enough for some spirited riding yet compliant enough to soak up road imperfections. The Forza will accommodate a pillion with ease. The seat is big and comfortable with a higher back support than either the Burgman or Silverwing. This back support doubled as a barrier, stopping the pillion sliding forward while braking. My pillion was most happy with her ride (she thought the Forza looked pretty damned cool too)

Now… the gadgets… there are many… from the decidedly useful “keyless ignition” which consists of a plastic key fob that activates the bike when the rider is nearby, to a less useful “tiptronic” type transmission. First up, the Keyless ignition; essentially the Forza is controlled by a big knob… not the guy riding… an actual knob… like you might see on a washing machine. When the key fob is within range of the bike you just push the knob and this activates the electronics… you know they are active because everything glows blue… then you can turn the knob to the On, Off, Lock etc positions. Once set to “on” you just retract the side stand, hit the starter button and you are away. When the fob is a few feet from the bike the Forza automatically immobilizes itself. In emergency situations there is a hidden slot where you can use a standard key for access.

The instruments are varied and easy to read… they include a fuel gauge and trip meter along with a rev gauge and “selected gear” display for manual mode. Then up the top of the dash is a most amusing fuel consumption readout, which while I rode varied from about 13 km/L to 68 km/L… I wouldn’t rely on it too much but an entertaining feature no less. The twin headlights are powerful and functional… they also make this bike look pretty cool… like a miniature spaceship… or something… well… something futuristic.

Manufacturer Specifications
Max power at shaft 14.3 Kw (19 HP) @ 7500 rpm
Max torque 21.1 Nm (15.5) @ 5,500 rpm
Engine Type 90 Degree V-Twin, 4 stroke
Cylinder Capacity 249cc
Seat height 710mm
Dry weight 173kg
Kerb weight 187 kg
Fuel tank capacity 12 litres
Starting Electric
Transmission “Twist and Go” Automatic Transmission (Vmatic)
Storage volume 62litre underseat 5litre front drawer
Cooling Water cooled
Bore X stroke 72.7 x 60.0 mm
Compression ratio 10.0:1
Chassis —
Front suspension 33mm telescopic fork, 100mm axle travel
Rear suspension Dual damper unit swingarm, 95mm axle travel
Front brake 240x4mm hydraulic disc with 3piston caliper
Rear brake 240x5mm hydraulic disc with single piston caliper
Front wheel/tyre 110/90 – 13″
Rear wheel/tyre 130/70 – 12″
Length 2165mm
Width 760mm
Wheelbase 1545mm
Max speed (km/hr) —
Type approval —
Consumption (ECE applicable text cycle) —
Consumption @km/h – km/l —
Audible Indicator no
Full helmet storage yes
Glove box yes x2
Fuel Guage yes
Trip Meter yes
Seat release (via remote control) no
Seat release (remote, ignition/switch) yes
Alarm no (anti theft system inc)

autocoops source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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