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Home » Honda scooter, Scooter

Honda Dylan 150

Submitted by on September 9, 2012 – 4:29 amNo Comment

Honda Dylan 150Honda Dylan 150 – This is the vision flashing in my brain as I sign the insurance forms at my local Honda distributor while glancing out the large plate glass window at rain, slick road and kamikaze car drivers intent on demolishing the Dylan like a hungry redneck at ‘all you can eat rib night’. Why the panic… well you see the Honda Dylan 150 looks good, a far cry from bikes that I own, my bikes tend to end up on the ground soon after pickup, usually not intentional but I never worry, you see. To me a scooter is a Tool, not a work of art; once it has some scratches on it I cease worrying about the thing and just use it.

This is where we get back to the Honda Dylan 150. It looks good, with it’s high tech angles, multifaceted lights and beautiful metallic paint… it looks like a modern maybe even futuristic version of, well, of a scooter.

Fortunately looks are not the end of the Honda Dylan tale. After riding this scooter for a few days I concluded that as far as tools go this one is certainly fit for the job, even if it is pretty. Let me give you some background; The Honda Dylan was designed by Honda’s European design team and built in Italy to compete with the likes of Vespa, in an age old “if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em” scenario. I was genuinely expecting a lot of show and very little go… the opposite was almost true. The Dylan 150 stood up to the rigorous test of suburban commuting very well indeed. The 13 inch alloy wheels initially felt like they turned the bike into some sort of boat, slow to react and hard to throw around. However if you ride it more like a traditional ‘motorcycle’ i.e. push the bars a bit and use your body weight, the bigger wheel proved a hard act to follow. The Dylan feels upright and stable in all conditions and will lean into a corner and hold fast if your inner racer comes out. More importantly, if your daily commute includes motorway/highway riding this scooter will do the job admirably.

You will note I said suburban rather than urban commuting. Although the Dylan 150 performs admirably in tight traffic and around town with a good turning circle, a slightly lighter/smaller wheeled scooter will do a better job if your commute is limited to inner city use. This scooter does feel quite large, it isn’t especially but it feels it. The weight is not excessive although the 9 litre fuel tank brings the running weight up around the 130kg mark. Thank you by the way to Honda for providing a tank that allows me to bypass the occasional fuel station. Anyway, the weight and the big wheels combine to make the Dylan feel heavier than it is.

Now I said that the Form over Function equation that I was expecting was reversed. That is not to say that the Honda Dylan looks bad, quite the contrary; from a distance this machine looks quite stunning. Unfortunately some of the materials used and fit and finish don’t stand up quite so well to a closer inspection. It isn’t so much that they are bad, it is just that with a little more effort this bike could have been very, very good. A few examples, just in case the Honda design team are reading. Foot pegs; the pillion foot pegs are effective but look and feel cheap when extended. The plastics used inboard could have been higher quality, darker, rubberised perhaps just something that didn’t look quite as cheap. The same goes for the seat fabric, dash surround and handlebar grips. Don’t get me wrong none of these are especially horrible but when you are competing with the Italians you need to get the details right. In most markets the Dylan is priced very competitively which offsets these minor complaints.

Manufacturer Specifications
Max power at shaft 15.55 HP (11.4 kW)) @ 8500 RPM
Max torque 14.20 Nm (10.5 ft.lbs) @ 7000 RPM
Engine Type Single cylinder four stroke
Cylinder Capacity 153.00 ccm (9.34 cubic inches)
Seat height 795 mm (31.3 inches)
Dry weight 120.0 kg (264.6 pounds)
Kerb weight —
Fuel tank capacity 9 litres (2.38 gallons)
Starting Electric
Transmission CVT “Twist and Go”
Storage volume —
Cooling Liquid Cooled
Bore X stroke 58.0 x 57.8 mm (2.3 x 2.3 inches)
Compression ratio 11.0:1
Chassis —
Front suspensions 33mm hydraulic telescopic fork, 88mm axle travel
Suspensions Dual damper unit swingarm, 75mm axle travel
Front brake 220mm hydraulic disc with dual-piston calliper and sintered metal pads
Rear brake 130mm leading/trailing drum
Front tyre 110/90 56L (tubeless)
Rear tyre 130/70 57L (tubeless)
Length 1,940 mm
Width 700 mm
Wheelbase 1330 mm
Max speed (km/hr) —
Type approval —
Consumption (ECE applicable text cycle) —
Consumption @km/h – km/l —
Audible Indicator no
Full helmet storage yes
Glove box yes
Fuel Guage yes
Trip Meter yes
Seat release (via remote control) no
Seat release (remote, ignition/switch) yes
Alarm no

autocoops source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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