classic

classic automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

Finance

Finance automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

insurance

Insurance automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

accident

accident automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

news

news automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

Home » Gilera, Scooter

Gilera Runner VXR 200

Submitted by on September 6, 2012 – 9:06 amNo Comment

Gilera Runner VXR 200On the road the Runner is a lot more bike than most scooters. The 21hp engine and low overall weight make the VXR 200 one of the quickest non-maxi scooters on the market. The Runner easily dispatches regular city traffic with just a simple twist of the throttle. I imagine there aren’t many scooters that would make it across town as fast as a Runner. The brakes on the Gilera are a lesson to other scooter manufacturers; big solid disc brakes front and back. The Runner is one of the fastest stopping bikes I’ve ever ridden. In fact from low speeds, say 50kph (31mph), the Runner would have to beat most motorcycles. It really is that good.

Living with the Runner is also going to be pretty easy. The 200cc four stroke engine returns 3.5L/100kms (67MPG) which is a significant improvement over the poor economy of the older two stroke version. Obviously it’s not as frugal as some bikes but who cares as you’ll be going MUCH quicker than pretty much everybody else. Gilera have also added a remote release for the under seat storage area on the ignition. Just push the key and voila…the seat is unlocked. Funny, because I looked for a key hole by the seat for about…well I won’t say how long as it’s kind of embarrassing. Gilera forgot to put a sign on the ignition barrel to indicate it opened the seat, so I’m not a complete idiot.

Handling wise the Runner is a complex bike. The first few rides on the Runner are unlikely to give much confidence where cornering is concerned. The reason is altitude. See the Gilera’s seat is literally miles in the sky; this is great for seeing over traffic, but arse when it comes to high performance riding. In general the ‘sitting on the toilet’ riding position of most scooters does not lend them to knee down road carving; the higher the seat position the worse it gets. It’s the reason smaller bodied scooters like a Suzuki Address 125 are so much easier to throw around. It’s a real shame that Gilera don’t seem to understand this as it would completely transform the Runner if they could lower the seat about five inches.

The ‘no’ bits come next. It’s awfully sad to see what once was great become less great. See the Runner was always the badass scooter for riders who, like me, wanted to hoon around like mad people. The new bike is no longer the king. It’s not even the queen…I think it may even be a jack. First off the older 180SP is faster, yep, read it and weep. Even an older well used 180SP from 1999 will whip the new Runner in a drag race. The new Honda SH300 will certainly be quicker too. The real let down though is the sound. The engine sounds like a bland piece of wood being beaten on an even blander concrete box by a very bland guy named Bob.

Now it must be said, I did hear a modified Gilera Runner VXR 200 recently and it sounded awesome. The owner had thrown away the horribly restrictive standard exhaust and replaced the air box with a foam K&N filter. With those simple mods the bike took on a whole new feeling. It also seems the brilliance of the CVT transmission and smooth torque curve of the engine combine to make the Runner simply ‘feel slow’. When I did time the bike I found it wasn’t quite as slow as I thought. I guess it’s all just a bit too ‘nice’ for me.

Manufacturer Specifications
Max power at shaft 15.3 Kw (21 HP)
Max torque 43 Nm at 5,500 rpm
Engine Type Single-cylinder Liquid cooled 4-stroke
Cylinder Capacity 198 cc
Seat height 780mm
Dry weight 145kg
Kerb weight —
Fuel tank capacity 12.2 litres
Starting Electric
Transmission “Twist and Go” Automatic Transmission (CVT)
Storage volume n/a
Cooling Water cooled
Bore X stroke 72.0 x 48.6 mm (2.8 x 1.9 inches)
Compression ratio 10.5:1
Chassis Steel Tube
Front suspension Ø 35 mm Telescopic fork
Rear suspension Two dual effect hydraulic dampers, helicoidal spring adjustable to four positions
Front brake 240mm Disc
Rear brake 220mm Disc
Front wheel/tyre 14”
Rear wheel/tyre 13”
Length 1855 mm
Width 740 mm
Wheelbase 1340 mm
Max speed (km/hr) —
Type approval Euro3
Consumption (ECE applicable text cycle) —
Consumption @km/h – km/l —
Audible Indicator no
Full helmet storage yes
Glove box no
Fuel Guage yes
Trip Meter yes
Seat release (via remote control) no
Seat release (remote, ignition/switch) yes
Alarm no

autocoops source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

Insurance Tips : Many insurance companies give a discount of 10% or more to their customers that maintain other insurance contracts under the same roof (such as auto or health insurance). Consider obtaining a quote for other types of insurance from the same company that provides your homeowners' insurance. You may end up saving on two annual policy premiums.

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.

*